26 Dec

Istanbul’s must see places

Grand Bazaar

Grand Bazaar

Discover the Grand Bazaar in Istanbul, one of the largest and oldest covered markets in the world. With over 4,000 shops spread across 60 lanes, the bazaar offers a unique shopping experience for those looking for Turkish products and souvenirs, such as spices, ceramic plates, ornamental lamps, tapestries, and hammam soaps. For the best bargains, we recommend venturing off the main lanes. While you’re here, don’t forget to indulge in a cup of Turkish coffee or some snacks from the cafes in the bazaar. During the summer months, the bazaar can get crowded, so why not visit in the early morning or late afternoon to avoid the crowds? A stop at the Grand Bazaar is often included in city tours of Istanbul, so make sure you don’t miss out on this memorable shopping experience.
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Istanbul Archaeological Museums

Embark on a captivating journey through the ages as you discover one of the world’s largest and most fascinating museums. As the first museum in Turkey, it opened its doors to the public in 1891 and boasts an awe-inspiring collection of over one million artifacts from the Greek, Roman, and Byzantine civilizations. From intricately crafted sculptures to ancient pottery and stunning mosaics, this museum has it all. Immerse yourself in history and experience the wonder of this magnificent collection that brings the past to life.
Rahmi M. Koc Museum

Rahmi M. Koç Museum

İstanbul Rahmi M. Koç Museum, which has a unique view of the shores of the Golden Horn, intertwined with the historical beauties of Istanbul, has been the only address that can offer culture and entertainment together since 1994. The opportunity to take a tour through all the details of history, from the “submarine” tour to the “Nostalgic Train” tour, from airplanes to classic cars, and much more await visitors at the Istanbul Rahmi M. Koç Museum. Rahmi M. Koç Museum, which is the first and only industrial museum in our country reflecting the developments in the history of industry, communication, and transportation, appeals to those who want to spend a long and full day with its collection of more than 14 thousand objects, training, and workshops for children.
Sultanahmet Square

Sultanahmet Square

Discover the captivating history of Sultanahmet Square, which dates back to the remarkable Roman and Byzantine periods. Once a chariot racing track, it was the hub of social and sporting events in Constantinople, the Byzantine Empire’s capital. Over the years, Sultanahmet Square has been the witness to many significant events and transformations, including the construction of awe-inspiring monuments and structures. Don’t miss the chance to explore the timeless beauty of this iconic square when you’re planning your Istanbul tours.
Basilica Cistern

Basilica Cistern

The cistern in Istanbul, originally known as the Basilica Cistern, is a unique underground structure. It was built beneath the Stoa Basilica to provide water to the Great Palace and surrounding buildings. It could store up to 80,000 cubic meters of water delivered via 20 kilometers of aqueducts. The cistern was closed when the Byzantine emperors relocated from the Great Palace and was forgotten by city authorities. It was rediscovered in 1545 by scholar Petrus Gyllius. After being cleaned and renovated in 1985, it was opened to the public in 1987 and is now one of the city’s popular tourist attractions.
Galata Tower

Galata Tower

Galata Tower: A symbol of Istanbul’s rich heritage and it is a cylindrical stone tower in Istanbul that stands approximately 63 meters tall. It was built in the Byzantine era as a wooden tower to oversee Constantinople and the Golden Horn. Despite being destroyed, it was rebuilt by the Genoese community in 1348 and served as a jail, observatory, and watchtower during the Ottoman era.
After a restoration in 1960, Galata Tower was opened to the public and features a 360-degree viewing platform, offering stunning panoramic views of Istanbul’s historic peninsula and cityscape. It’s a must-visit attraction that offers a unique perspective on Istanbul’s rich heritage.
Suleymaniye Mosque

Suleymaniye Mosque

Come and experience the grandeur of the Süleymaniye Camii (Suleymaniye Mosque), a masterpiece designed by the legendary architect Mimar Sinan. Its awe-inspiring size and elegantly decorated interior will leave you in awe. The supporting semi-domes and monumental arched spaces emphasize the sense of space and light. In the mosque complex, you will find a medrese, hospital, library, bazaar, and several tombs, including those of Süleyman the Magnificent and his wife Haseki Hürrem, adorned with precious metals, stones, and stained glass. Don’t miss the tomb of Mimar Sinan located here. Join us and be mesmerized by the beauty and grandeur of this magnificent mosque complex.
Kariye Mosque

Kariye Mosque

The Kariye Mosque is a vital guide to the past and an essential part of Istanbul’s rich cultural and historical heritage. A multi-layered structure, it is a unique historical document with a distinctive architectural style, spatial design, dimensions, and decorative elements such as mosaics, frescoes, and various period additions. The mosque stands as one of the most well-preserved examples of late Roman art in the world, making it a must-see for anyone interested in history and art. By visiting the Kariye Mosque, you can experience the beauty and richness of the past while gaining a deeper understanding of Istanbul’s cultural and historical significance.
Dolmabahce Palace

Dolmabahçe Palace

Dolmabahce Palace Istanbul, located on the European coast of the Bosporus, is a stunning example of Ottoman architecture. Built by Sultan Abdülmecid I, the palace marries Ottoman Baroque and Neoclassical styles to create a masterpiece. The palace has witnessed historical decisions and harboured countless secrets within its walls. It was home to six Sultans and visited by Mustafa Kemal Atatürk. Dolmabahçe Palace Istanbul is a harmonious blend of cultures, waiting to be discovered.
The Blue Mosque

The Blue Mosque

Discover one of Turkey’s top attractions with a visit to the Blue Mosque, also known as the Sultanahmet Mosque, in Istanbul. This stunning historical building, constructed in the 1600s, seamlessly combines Islamic and Byzantine architecture to create a truly awe-inspiring experience. The intricate interior boasts over 20,000 hand-crafted ceramic tiles and over 200 stained glass windows, providing incredible lighting and a mystical atmosphere that will leave you breathless. Spend some time in the courtyard square, where you can enjoy fantastic people-watching opportunities. Do not miss your chance to see this landmark building and immerse yourself in its rich history and beauty.

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